Health and the Environment Archive

  • © UNEP

    Health and climate change 3

    Towns and cities: The urban population of developing countries is expected to increase from 2.3 billion in 2005 to 4 billion by 2030. And as cities swell with inadequate housing...

    Full Story

  • © Khin Aye Myat UNEP

    Health and climate change 4

    Extreme events: Between 1998 and 2007, 2 billion people – around a third of the global population – were affected by natural disasters, many linked to such unusual weather as...

    Full Story

  • © T Alipalo UNEP

    Health and climate change 5

    Population and migration: The global population is expected to increase to 9.2 billion by 2050, mostly in the developing world. This will interact with climate change to reduce further the...

    Full Story

  • G.Odal-Devora

    Healing the Earth through myths and dance

    ‘Mother Earth, true, does not need any help to heal herself. If left to herself, she will in her own time renew the Earth. But do we stand back and...

    Full Story

  • Toxic Baby - featured

    Exposure 1

    Manmade chemicals are everywhere, from food to furniture, cosmetics to computers, toys to toothpaste. They have brought great benefits, swelling our harvests, beating previously unvanquishable diseases, making possible a host...

    Full Story

  • Toxic Baby - featured

    Exposure 2

    Documentary film-maker Penelope Jagessar Chaffer – the first black female director to be nominated for a British Academy of Film and Television Arts award – has spent years researching people’s...

    Full Story

  • Toxic Baby - featured

    Exposure 3

    Documentary film-maker Penelope Jagessar Chaffer – the first black female director to be nominated for a British Academy of Film and Television Arts award – has spent years researching people’s...

    Full Story

  • Black carbon and ozone

    Black carbon and ozone

    It seems almost too good to be true, but a set of measures to cut two widespread pollutants could greatly reduce both one of the world's biggest causes of disease...

    Full Story

  • © GenevaLunch.com

    Urban health 1

    Just because most of us live in cities doesn’t mean we can’t get out and play. It’s good for us: according to the World Health Organization, at least 30 minutes...

    Full Story

  • Ben-Challis_www.agreenerfestival.com_.jpg

    Urban health 2

    Cycle madness Cycling to work or school improves cardiovascular health and overall well-being, and getting people out of their cars makes a significant dent in a city’s carbon emissions, not...

    Full Story

  • Follow us on Facebook