Food Archive

  • (c) Specialiststock.com

    Wondergrains

    We know of 50,000 edible plant species, of which just three – maize, rice and wheat – are the staple foods of nearly two-thirds of Earth’s people. But some of the grains...

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  • Tunza_10.3-Eng-v5

    Farmification

    ‘On the edges of large cities in China, factory complexes are constructed to accommodate a growing global demand for products like electronics. The workforce is made up of people who...

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  • (c) Marc Ryckaert_CC-BY-SA-3.0

    Windows on the world of pollination

    3: Bats and cactus The Mexican long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), which migrates between its native country and the southern United States, is an important pollinator of various desert plants, particularly...

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  • (c) Simon van Noort_Iziko Museums of South Africa

    Windows on the world of pollination

    2: Figs and wasps It’s a relationship that goes back around 60 million years: the 2-millimetre fig wasp (of the family Agaonidae) can’t breed anywhere but inside a fig, and...

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  • (c) Marco Schmidt_CC-BY-SA

    Windows on the world of pollination

    1: Palms and weevils When West African oil palms were first cultivated in Malaysia in the 1960s, plantation owners discovered a major problem: the trees, though they seemed healthy, produced...

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  • (c) John Severns_PD

    No bees, no food

    That’s an exaggeration, but it’s true that without bees, we’d be without much of the food we take for granted: apples, peaches, strawberries, cherries, chocolate. In fact, honeybees pollinate around 80...

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  • (c) Nancy-Adamson_Xerces-Society_USDAgov

    Pollination: Food needs bugs and beasts!

    Think farming is a way of producing food that only needs people? Think again! If it weren’t for wild bees, butterflies, moths, beetles, bats and other animals helping us pollinate...

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  • (c) Hartmut-Schwarzback_Argus_Specialist-Stock

    Are we asking the right questions?

    Environmentalist and sustainability campaigner Tony Juniper was Executive Director of Friends of the Earth in the UK for eight years. Today, he advises international food companies including Danone and works...

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  • (c) H.-Gaines_UW_Madison_USDAgov-CC-BY-3.0

    Making the most of what we’ve got

    Wheat, maize and rice: there was a time when their ancestors only grew in the wild. Over thousands of years, however, through selective breeding, humankind domesticated them, to make them...

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  • (c) IITA Image Library

    Another way

    There’s more than one way to grow food sustainably. Here are just a few unique but powerful methods for making agriculture meet our needs while working with those of nature....

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