Food Archive

  • 5

    BOUNTY OF THE SEA

    Some unusual foods we get from the sea… Samphire Samphire, also known as glasswort, is a sea vegetable that grows plentifully on coastal shorelines and tidal mudflats. There are several...

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  • (c) C. Gomersall-Wildlife

    Fishery collapse: it really can happen…

    For centuries, fishermen in the North West Atlantic, off Newfoundland, relied on the seemingly plentiful cod stocks for their livelihoods. But in 1992, after decades of overfishing using trawlers, the...

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  • 3

    Fisheries: wild or farmed?

    There has long been argument about whether aquaculture – the alternative to wild-harvested fish – is better or worse for the environment. While farmed fish like salmon or prawns take...

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  • 2

    The last wild catch: Some answers

    Setting waters aside One logical solution is to set aside marine areas for conservation, and there are some such areas. But so far, only 1.2 per cent of the world’s...

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  • (c) Jorgen-Freund-Aurora-Specialist-Stock.jpg

    The last wild catch: The problems

    ‘The world faces the nightmare possibility of fishless oceans by 2050.’ That was the message of a 2010 UNEP report that concluded that 30 per cent of the world’s fish...

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  • (c) Bisayan Lady_CC-BY-SA and T. Castelazo_CC-BY-SA 2.5

    Wonderfoods?

    The grass pea It can save the hungry in the short term, even if it can ruin health in the long term. The drought-tolerant, flood-tolerant grass pea (Lathyrus sativus), first...

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  • (c) Stefan Auth / imagebroker/Still Pictures/ Specialiststock.com

    Wondergrains

    5: Teff Teff means ‘lost’, so called because of its tiny 1-millimetre diameter grain. Yet about a kilo of grains is enough to sow a 1-hectare field – about 100...

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  • (c)  PD-USDA-ARS

    Wondergrains

    4: Millet Millet is thought to be one of the first cultivated cereals, dating back as much as 7,000 years to ancient Asia and Africa, where it still grows wild....

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  • (c) Biosphoto / Michel Gunther/BIOSphoto/Still Pictures/ Specialiststock.com

    Wondergrains

    3: Spelt A cousin to wheat, spelt was cultivated in ancient Europe and the Middle East, but fell out of favour because of its relatively low yield and its hard-to-remove...

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  • Quinua © M. Chédel-PD

    Wondergrains

    Quinoa – that’s ˈkiːnwɑː From an unknown to a superstar with a Facebook page – no, not a musician, not a sports wonder-kid, just a humble grain that’s delicious …...

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